LB - RoomStore 0503

Home | Classifieds | Place Ad | Public Notices | Galleries | Kudos | Obits | Real Estate | Subscriber Services | Villager | Health Directory | Contact Us
The Verde Independent | Cottonwood, Arizona

home : features : features May 26, 2016


3/26/2013 1:47:00 PM
'The Beginning of Life'
Planting time at Montezuma Well's Traditional Use Garden for 6th year
Jerry Honawa of Hotevilla, Ariz., has been involved with the Traditional Use Garden at the Montezuma Well since the project’s inception six years ago. Honawa says the garden is known as “the mother,” as in the Mother Earth. Friends of the Well and Gardens for Humanity have partnered to grow crops for a Traditional Use Garden. VVN/Bill Helm
Jerry Honawa of Hotevilla, Ariz., has been involved with the Traditional Use Garden at the Montezuma Well since the project’s inception six years ago. Honawa says the garden is known as “the mother,” as in the Mother Earth. Friends of the Well and Gardens for Humanity have partnered to grow crops for a Traditional Use Garden. VVN/Bill Helm
VVN/Bill HelmShalene Yazzie of Flagstaff, and Gwynne Reese of Sedona, from left, plant Cushaw Squash seeds Friday at the Montezuma Well garden.
VVN/Bill Helm

Shalene Yazzie of Flagstaff, and Gwynne Reese of Sedona, from left, plant Cushaw Squash seeds Friday at the Montezuma Well garden.

Bill Helm
Reporter


RIMROCK - For the past six years, the Friends of the Well have planted a Traditional Use Garden at Montezuma Well. Partnering with Gardens for Humanity and their fifth annual Spring Planting Festival, the field south of the picnic grounds is irrigated as it had been by the Sinaguans and the Hohokam, many years ago. Which means maximizing growth with minimal water.

On March 22, members of Friends of the Well, Gardens for Humanity, and non-affiliated volunteers spent the morning planting corn, beans, squash, melons, sunflowers, cotton, and gourds. And in October, the Friends of the Well will sponsor a Traditional Use Garden Harvest, a non-profit even where they will give away the fruits of their labor. Last year, nine families were fed with food from the garden, according to Jerry Honawa, Hopi elder and farmer. Honawa participated in the morning of gardening at the well. "This is the beginning of life," Honawa says. "This field is referred to as 'the mother,' as in the Mother Earth."

"Even mythologically, we came from the Earth," says Richard Sidy, president of Gardens for Humanity, who sees the Traditional Use Garden as an agricultural renaissance of sorts. And that the garden is at Montezuma Well, Sidy says, is appropriate.

"Before it became a national monument," Sidy says of the well, "it was a sacred place. These were pilgrimaged trails. Like the womb of the cultures.

"Families used to save their seeds," Sidy says. "This project reconnects us with the heritage of our area. We're all working together, building an agricultural team in the Verde Valley.

"We want to build that sense of place," Sidy adds. "We want to build a richer, cultural identity." Sidy says that projects like the garden "serve as a unifying source."

Bob Burke, vice president for Friends of the Well, talked of the garden as an opportunity to "get out with like-minded people, putting something in the ground, and watching it grow."

Rose Marie Licher, board member with Gardens for Humanity, says the process of working this traditional use garden is a "great way to find out how Native Americans survived without water. We need to learn these traditions our ancestors used to survive."

Kayo Parsons-Korn, president of Friends of the Well, talked of cotton as the Sinaguans' primary material for clothing, saying how clothing made of cotton kept them cooler in the warm summer days in the Verde Valley.

"I live where I cannot have a garden," says Judy Barnes of Cottonwood, "so I try to seek out gardens in the area where I can work. Maybe the green thumb in me, my desire to garden, continues. This is a way of me getting close to the Earth"

Gwynne Reese of Sedona says that she has been curious about Hopi dry farming. "Now I see what I could have been doing," Reese said. "I garden at home, and now I am learning what has been working for generations."

Shalene Yazzie of Flagstaff was one of many who volunteered her time planting at the garden. "In Flagstaff, it is too early to plant our corn. So I came here to get a jump start."




    Most Viewed     Recently Commented
•   Police soon will have one more reason to pull you over (4750 views)

•   What's hot in Verde Valley job market? (2956 views)

•   Cornville man charged with child molestation seeks plea (2875 views)

•   Marana man suffers skull injury, brain bleed following ATV crash (2737 views)

•   Motorcycle rider suffers head injuries in crash (2195 views)





Article Comment Submission Form
Comments are not posted immediately. Submissions must adhere to our Use of Service Terms of Use agreement. Rambling or nonsensical comments may not be posted. Comments are limited to Facebook character limits. In order for us to reasonably manage this feature we may limit excessive comment entries.
Submit an Article Comment
First Name:
Required
Last Name:
Required
Telephone:
Required
Email:
Required
Comment:
Required
Passcode:
Required
Anti-SPAM Passcode Click here to see a new mix of characters.
This is an anti-SPAM device. It is not case sensitive.
   


Advanced Search

HSE - We want to hear from you
HSE - Father Son Look a Like Contest
HSE - Readers Choice 300x100
Find more about Weather in Cottonwood, AZ
Click for weather forecast





Submission Links
 •  Submit your feedback about our site

Find It Features Blogs Celebrate Submit Extras Other Publications Local Listings
Classifieds | Place Ad | Galleries | Kudos | Real Estate | Subscriber Services | e-News | RSS | Site Map | Find Verde Jobs | Contact Us
LB - Yavapai Herbal Services

© Copyright 2016 Western News&Info, Inc.® The Verde Independent is the information source for Cottonwood and Verde Valley area communities in Northern Arizona. Original content may not be reprinted or distributed without the written permission of Western News&Info, Inc.® Verde News Online is a service of WNI. By using the Site, verdenews.com ®, you agree to abide and be bound by the Site's terms of use and Privacy Policy, which prohibit commercial use of any information on the Site. Click here to submit your questions, comments or suggestions. Verde News Online is a proud publication of Western News&Info Inc.® All Rights Reserved.

Software © 1998-2016 1up! Software, All Rights Reserved